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The Problem Solved 

“A charity money has only one life. A Social Business money can be invested over and over again."

 

Society is lacking an adequate and system of economic management and social relations. We are surrounded by socially self-destructive feedback loops which keep people distracted and struggling with conflicts, disputes and quarrels. Current system is simply and fundamentally opposed to the idea of prosperity. 

  • The digital society is quickly emerging, blending the physical and the virtual world.
  • This digital disruption affects not only our business models and how we work, but also how we live and interact.
  • However, technology is doing more than changing the way we interact, the relationship between people and technology itself is changing.
  • More than ever, technology is becoming part of our identity, part of who we are.

It's now time to seriously rethink society.

 

What's the alternative?

  • Improve Worldview of Human by holistic approach of Spiral Dynamics Integral & Gamification
  • Unity of the People by deliberative social innovation
  • Establish a Public Cooperative Open Source Economy Ecosystem

 

By our R&D we focus is on interweaving a new model so smoothly and seamlessly into the currently prevailing system, that it will not be perceived as opposition, but rather as a higher quality competitive model, which gradually replaces the old one. We advocate the evolutional approach, which we consider to be civilization’s only sure way for development. Our method is to create a high-quality example while showcasing our understanding of what it means to be human. People should decide for themselves which way they choose to go and trust.

"More and more of us are actually unnecessary to the operations of the economy...

We need a posthuman politics for a posthuman economy"

- Adam Greenfield, author of Radical Technologies

 

BREAKING DOWN 'Business Ecosystem'

 In the 1930s, British botanist Arthur Tansley introduced the term ‘ecosystem’ to describe a community of organisms interacting with each other and their environments — air, water, earth, etc. In order to thrive, these organisms compete and collaborate with each other on available resources, co-evolve, and jointly adapt to external disruptions.

 Business strategist James Moore adopted this biological concept in his 1993 Harvard Business Review article “Predators and Prey: A New Ecology of Competition” through which he paralleled companies operating in the increasingly interconnected world of commerce to a community of organisms adapting and evolving to survive. Moore suggested that a company be viewed not as a single firm in an industry, but as a member of a business ecosystem with participants spanning across multiple industries.

 Advances in technology and increasing globalization have changed ideas about the best ways to do business, and the idea of a business ecosystem is thought to help companies understand how to thrive in this rapidly changing environment. Moore defined the business ecosystem as “an economic community supported by a foundation of interacting organizations and individuals — the organisms of the business world. The economic community produces goods and services of value to customers, who are themselves members of the ecosystem. The member organisms also include suppliers, lead producers, competitors and other stakeholders. Over time, they co-evolve their capabilities and roles and tend to align themselves with the directions set by one or more central companies. Those companies holding leadership roles may change over time, but the function of ecosystem leader is valued by the community because it enables members to move toward shared visions to align their investments and to find mutually supportive roles.”

In effect, the business ecosystem consists of a network of interlinked companies that dynamically interact with each other through competition and cooperation to grow sales and survive. An ecosystem includes suppliers, distributors, consumers, government, processes, products and competitors. When an ecosystem thrives, it means that the participants have developed patterns of behavior that streamline the flow of ideas, talent and capital throughout the system.

Being a part of a business ecosystem provides mechanisms to leverage technology, achieve excellence in research and business competence and compete effectively against other companies. Some other goals of a business ecosystem include:

  • driving new collaborations to address rising social and environmental challenges
  • harnessing creativity and innovation to lower the cost of production or allow members to reach new customers
  • accelerating the learning process to effectively collaborate and share insights, skills, expertise and knowledge
  • creating new ways to address fundamental human needs and desires

Ecosystems create strong barriers to entry for new competition, as potential entrants not only have to duplicate or better the core product, but they also must compete against the entire system of independent complementing businesses and suppliers that form the network.

Being a part of a business ecosystem provides mechanisms to leverage technology, achieve excellence in research and business competence and compete effectively against other companies. But in a less-competitive ecosystem, groups such as a government, charities and community groups might collaborate because each entity has a common shared interest and goal. Fledgling innovation ecosystems: social enterprises, start-ups, community groups and other third sector organisations which are identifying gaps, and designing and pioneering sustainable solutions, are experiencing fragility as they spring up in silos are underfunded and are subject to political volatility.

Some other goals of a business ecosystem include:

  • driving new collaborations to address rising social and environmental challenges
  • harnessing creativity and innovation to lower the cost of production or allow members to reach new customers
  • accelerating the learning process to effectively collaborate and share insights, skills, expertise and knowledge
  • creating new ways to address fundamental human needs and desires

“Digital business drives dramatic changes in organizations’ business ecosystems, making them larger, more complex and essential to strategy,”

 

Humanner can best be described as a Social IT Project. 

It will do this typically by facilitating access to the benefits of open source infrastructure through the application of technological expertise and services; what might be termed Resource-as-a-Service (RaaS). By the Humanner Collaborative Social Economy model give financial self-sustainability and emerge the digital ecosystem to connect informal market, unlock the power at the bottom of pyramid, and deliver economic prosperity.


 

Muhammad Yunus kind of social business model:

https://www.muhammadyunus.org/index.php/social-business/social-business

 

Alibaba’s Taobao business model:

http://egyptinnovember.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Day-2_ResearchPolicy_1_Dr-Xiaohong-He.pdf

 

GCR 4P Contracting Model:

https://www.globalchallengesretreat.org/global-goals-4p-contracting-model/

The 4P is a public private purpose partnership model which can be initiated by the public or private sector and is designed, structured and negotiated transparently within an accountable framework. The Model is a development combining existing procurement methodologies for privately financed initiatives, social impact measurement methods and the tri-partite contracting device of social impact bonds and

 

(i) enables any individual with the knowledge, expertise and the boldness to take action, to work collaboratively with public and private stakeholders to solve global and local challenges.(ii) enables philanthropists and corporations to align their donations and CSR budgets to national SDG priorities, support and collaborate on community-based innovations and to receive measurable Social Return On Investment (SROI)(iii) enables public sector buyers with an alternative way of procuring social value with a new no-risk contracting model to access and co-produce social value and social impact with those they are there to serve

 


 

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